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Sheen

East Sheen, also known as Sheen, is a suburb of London, England in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames.

Its long high street has goods stores, convenience services, offices, restaurants, cafés, pubs and suburban supermarkets and is also the economic hub for Mortlake of which East Sheen was once a manor. This commercial thoroughfare, well served by public transport, is the Upper Richmond Road West which connects Richmond to Putney. Central to this street is The Triangle, a traffic island with a war memorial and an old milestone dating from 1751, marking the ten-mile distance to Cornhill in the City of London. The main railway station serving the area, Mortlake, is centred 300m north of this. Sheen has a mixture of low-rise and mid-rise buildings and it has parks and open spacesincluding its share of Richmond Park, accessed via Sheen Gate; Palewell Common, which has a playground, playing fields, tennis courts and a pitch and putt course; and East Sheen Common which is owned by the National Trust and leads into Bog Gate, another gate of Richmond Park.

 

History

Earliest references specifically to the present area of land, rather than references to parts of Mortlake, emerge in the 13th century, generally under its early name of Westhall. Originally one carucate, it was sold in 1473 by Michael Gaynsford and Margaret his wife in the right of Margaret to William Welbeck, citizen and haberdasher, of London. The Welbecks held it until selling in 1587. Later owners of what remained, the Whitfields, Juxons and Taylors were equally not titled, as with Mortlake's manorial owners, nor had an above average size or lavish manor house.

The southern estate of Temple Grove, East Sheen, first belonged to Sir Abraham Cullen, who was created a baronet in 1661. He died in 1668, and his son Sir John in 1677. The latter's son Sir Rushout Cullen seems to have sold the estate shortly afterwards to Sir John Temple, attorney-general of Ireland, brother to Sir William Temple, diplomat and author, who was earlier of adjoining West Sheen, giving the home his name. It belonged to the Temples until Henry Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston, politician his grandson of the same profession sold it soon after coming of age in 1805, who would later would serve as Foreign Secretary three times and twice as Prime Minister. It was bought by Sir Thomas Bernard, who rebuilt the Jacobean stylefront of the house shown in a drawing hung in the house of 1611. Sir Thomas sold it about 1811 to the Rev. William Pearson who founded the Temple Grove Preparatory School for boys which moved in 1907 to Eastbourne and the estate was given over to house and apartment builders as demand rose for work in the City of London and park-side London retirement properties.

East Sheen was included in the Metropolitan Police District in 1840.

Before 1900, Mortlake developed a secular vestry to help administer poor relief, maintain roads, ditches and other affairs. From 1892 to 1894 Mortlake (including East Sheen) formed part of the expanded Municipal Borough of Richmond. In 1894 nearby North Sheen was created as a civil parish, being split off from Mortlake and remaining in the Municipal Borough of Richmond. The remainder of Mortlake (including East Sheen) was instead transferred to Barnes Urban District.

In 1965 North Sheen was incorporated in Kew which, with the rest of the Municipal Borough of Richmond, joined Twickenham and Barnes M.B.s to form the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. In the wards of the United Kingdom, Sheen has the largest share of Richmond Park of its surrounding five wards.

 

Sheen is covered by The Richmond and Twickenham Times. Should you require a copy of this paper please let us know prior to ordering a Minicab or Executive Taxi.

 

Should you require a taxi or mini cab whilst in Sheen please contact the team at Ridesmiths